Checking residuals (gastric residuals, that is)

Ah, the fun tradition of “residual 250 cc…hold TF?” This national survey shows that there is very wide variance in how residuals are checked, and how much is “concerning.” 200 cc? 250 cc? 500 cc? Going once, going twice…

Disclaimer: the information below is about adults. Who knows if the answers are the same for a pediatric population? Not me.

This ACG clinical guideline on nutrition in the hospital setting opened my eyes (mostly to how much we don’t know about managing nutrition). The authors write that checking residuals “has been shown to be a poor marker of true gastric volume, gastric emptying, risk of aspiration, pneumonia, and poor outcomes.” The sensitivity of residuals for predicting aspiration is 2-8%. This JAMA study shows that in the ICU, checking residuals didn’t affect development of ventilation-associated pneumonia. In other papers, one of the authors has advocated for the abolishment of checking residuals in nursing practice (see this link for good, practical information).

When is checking residuals useful?

Checking residuals is thought to be most useful in the first 48 hours of initiating tube feeds, as patients are getting increased to goal rate. If the residuals are building up (see below), it might be an indication to pause the tube feeds and make sure there’s nothing wrong with the tube, there are no tube feeds leaking into the peritoneum (this is actually something terrifying that can happen), etc. If your patient is intubated/sedated/obtunded, residuals are the only measure you have–but if the patient is awake and alert, you could talk to them and ask if they’re having worsening nausea, bloating, etc.

How high is too high? When do tube feeds need to be held for residuals?

I don’t know where the adage, “hold TF for residuals >200 cc” comes from. Abbott Nutrition states that when residuals > 500 cc, consider holding tube feeds. (For perspective, the human stomach can accomodate +/- 1 liter.) Check your institutional hospital policy, but…the general message of this post is that you shouldn’t be too worried.

Does checking residuals have harmful effects?

It is known that protein clots when the pH <5.0 (stomach acid pH is usually between 1.5-3.5). Could checking residuals lead to refluxing clotted protein, increasing the likelihood of clogging the tube? This small study (n=30) says, yes. In the group undergoing regular residual checks, there were 10 clogging events, compared to 1 in the no-residual checks group.

Checking residuals can also lead to tube feeds being held unnecessarily–if higher residuals aren’t a good sign of impending aspiration, we’re just holding tube feeds for hours at a time, depriving patients of the nutrition they’re supposed to be getting.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.