What is an oxymizer?

What does this thing even look like?

Glad you asked:

Sometimes the oxymizer is referred to as a “nasal moustache” because the reservoir is positioned under the nose, as in this instructive 1-minute video from RT Clinic.

What’s the conversion between oxymizer and nasal cannula?

Roughly 1:2––For example, 3 L by oxymizer delivers approximately the same amount of FiO2 that 6 L NC does. Some oxymizer devices can provide oxygen at a 1:4 level (so 1 L oxymizer=4 L NC) and deliver up to 20 L NC! Pretty cool.

What are the advantages of using an oxymizer?

For patients at home, oxymizers make portable oxygen tanks last longer (because the flow rate is lower). How much longer? It depends on the individual patient’s O2 needs and activity level. The lower flow rate also decreases nasal dryness and the discomfort of oxygen blasting into the nares all the time. From a pragmatic standpoint, most clinicians would be nervous about keeping patients at 7-8 L NC at all times (especially on a general medical floor), but an oxymizer can be used to keep patients with higher O2 requirements who are otherwise stable on the floor. For most patients with long-term, high-flow oxygen needs, oxymizers just make more sense.

If it’s “better” than nasal cannula, why don’t we use it all the time? Are there any downsides to the oxymizer?

Cost-wise, oxymizers can be expensive. Not all insurance companies cover oxymizers. The retail price of a single device is (as of this post) about $400 and the manufacturers recommend replacing the device every 3-4 weeks to ensure the membrane continues to work properly. In addition, some patients find the heavier tubing uncomfortable to wear. As far as I know, that’s pretty much it.

Disclaimer: I don’t get paid by Big Respiratory to write this. I have noticed more and more patients wearing oxymizers in the past couple of years who have been able to stay out of stepdown units and ICUs just because they “need more than 6 L NC, which is too much for the floor.”

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